Man charged with murder of Leslieville bystander had extensive criminal record, was on bail

 The man charged with killing an east-end mom during a daytime Leslieville shooting was out on bail at the time of the shooting and banned from possessing weapons, the Star has confirmed.Toronto police announced Thursday they had charged 32-year-old Damian Hudson with second-degree murder after investigators allege a fight broke out between Hudson and two other unknown suspects. A stray bullet killed 44-year-old Karolina Huebner-Makurat, a mother of two young girls.Court records show Hudson has an extensive criminal history dating back more than a decade.Police spokesperson Stephanie Sayer confirmed Hudson was on two release orders and subject to three firearms prohibitions — a standard condition of bail or probation for those accused of violent offences — when he was arrested. It’s not clear what charges led to those orders.But court records indicate Hudson has previously been convicted of several assault, robbery and drug offences dating back to 2010.In 2019, Hudson was found guilty of aggravated assault and possession of a weapon for a purpose dangerous to the public peace after he stabbed a man in the heart the previous year. The stabbing followed an altercation in Scarborough and left the victim in a coma for several weeks with “grievous bodily harm,” according to a sentencing decision from Ontario Court Justice Lawrence Feldman. The victim, he wrote, would be “cognitively and functionally impaired for life.”At the time of those charges, Hudson was also on two probation orders and a lifetime weapons ban, the judge noted, levelling a 15-month sentence against him followed by two years of probation, as well as subjecting him to an additional lifetime weapons ban and ordering him to seek counselling or treatment as ordered by a doctor. Hudson was acquitted of a more serious charge of attempted murder because of evidence the victim was verbally aggressive during the altercation, leaving the judge unconvinced Hudson intended to kill him.In considering his sentence, the judge took note of Hudson’s troubled past, including the loss of his father when he was nine years old and a previous addiction to crack cocaine. He was also the victim of a shooting in 2015, leading the Centre of Addiction and Mental Health to diagnose him in 2018 with PTSD and depression.At the time of sentencing, several family members and a girlfriend vouched for Hudson, saying he needed ongoing help for his mental health. Hudson himself told the court in a letter he felt he had “changed”.“He refers to his effort in upgrading his education, and his admission to community college,” the judge’s decision reads. “He explained that while it was hard for him to open up to probation officers, he initiated counselling at CAMH for his addictions. He says he is open to therapy. He asks for another chance.”Justice Feldman continued: “I acknowledge his effort to better himself and grapple with his demons. I believe he has the potential to reform with professional help and family support.”The decision also spells out a long criminal history — two counts of robbery in 2010; assault with a weapon and possession of an illegal firearm in 2011; drug charges in 2013; uttering threats in 2014; followed by drug and theft charges in 2015 through 2017. At times, Hudson faced between one day in jail followed by probation to one year in jail for those charges. The 15-month sentence delivered by Justice Feldman in 2019 was the longest jail time Hudson had received up until that point.On Thursday, Hudson appeared briefly in court by video from Toronto police’s 51 Division, his chin and arms tucked inside the body of a black shirt as he sat and listened to his lawyer discuss scheduling a bail hearing. He spoke only briefly to confirm his charges after a court officer misspoke.The shooting has left a widower, two children and a rattled community.Police were called to Queen Street East and Carlaw Avenue on July 7 just before 12:30 p.m. for reports of a shooting and said three people had been involved in a verbal and physical altercation before shots were fired. Huebner-Makurat, a 44-year-old from Toronto who just happened to be walking by, was hit by a bullet. According to police, two men had fired at each other; it’s unclear who fired the bullet that killed Huebner-Makurat. A memorial on the sidewalk where she fell grew over the weekend. A GoFundMe campaign launched for Huebner-Makurat had raised nearly $250,000 as of Thursday.A post from friends and family to the fundraising site characterized the mother of two, who they called Caroline, as a “shining light.”“Caroline loved life and was instant friends with everyone she met. Her great sense of humour always lightened up all situations. She was a kind soul, always eager to lend a helping hand,” the post reads.They said Huebner-Makurat is survived by her husband and two daughters, aged seven and four. Police continue to ask the public for help in identifying the two outstanding suspects, who police earlier said are considered armed and dangerous.Police are asking anyone with information about the shooting or the suspects to contact them at 416-808-7400 or call Crime Stoppers anonymously at 416-222-8477.With files from Marissa Birnie, Thea Gribilas, Marco Chown Oved and Victoria GibsonJennifer Pagliaro is a Toronto-based crime reporter for the Star. Follow her on Twitter: @jpags 

The man charged with killing an east-end mom during a daytime Leslieville shooting was out on bail at the time of the shooting and banned from possessing weapons, the Star has confirmed.

Toronto police announced Thursday they had charged 32-year-old Damian Hudson with second-degree murder after investigators allege a fight broke out between Hudson and two other unknown suspects. A stray bullet killed 44-year-old Karolina Huebner-Makurat, a mother of two young girls.

Court records show Hudson has an extensive criminal history dating back more than a decade.

Police spokesperson Stephanie Sayer confirmed Hudson was on two release orders and subject to three firearms prohibitions — a standard condition of bail or probation for those accused of violent offences — when he was arrested. It’s not clear what charges led to those orders.

But court records indicate Hudson has previously been convicted of several assault, robbery and drug offences dating back to 2010.

In 2019, Hudson was found guilty of aggravated assault and possession of a weapon for a purpose dangerous to the public peace after he stabbed a man in the heart the previous year. The stabbing followed an altercation in Scarborough and left the victim in a coma for several weeks with “grievous bodily harm,” according to a sentencing decision from Ontario Court Justice Lawrence Feldman. The victim, he wrote, would be “cognitively and functionally impaired for life.”

At the time of those charges, Hudson was also on two probation orders and a lifetime weapons ban, the judge noted, levelling a 15-month sentence against him followed by two years of probation, as well as subjecting him to an additional lifetime weapons ban and ordering him to seek counselling or treatment as ordered by a doctor. Hudson was acquitted of a more serious charge of attempted murder because of evidence the victim was verbally aggressive during the altercation, leaving the judge unconvinced Hudson intended to kill him.

In considering his sentence, the judge took note of Hudson’s troubled past, including the loss of his father when he was nine years old and a previous addiction to crack cocaine. He was also the victim of a shooting in 2015, leading the Centre of Addiction and Mental Health to diagnose him in 2018 with PTSD and depression.

At the time of sentencing, several family members and a girlfriend vouched for Hudson, saying he needed ongoing help for his mental health. Hudson himself told the court in a letter he felt he had “changed”.

“He refers to his effort in upgrading his education, and his admission to community college,” the judge’s decision reads. “He explained that while it was hard for him to open up to probation officers, he initiated counselling at CAMH for his addictions. He says he is open to therapy. He asks for another chance.”

Justice Feldman continued: “I acknowledge his effort to better himself and grapple with his demons. I believe he has the potential to reform with professional help and family support.”

The decision also spells out a long criminal history — two counts of robbery in 2010; assault with a weapon and possession of an illegal firearm in 2011; drug charges in 2013; uttering threats in 2014; followed by drug and theft charges in 2015 through 2017. At times, Hudson faced between one day in jail followed by probation to one year in jail for those charges. The 15-month sentence delivered by Justice Feldman in 2019 was the longest jail time Hudson had received up until that point.

On Thursday, Hudson appeared briefly in court by video from Toronto police’s 51 Division, his chin and arms tucked inside the body of a black shirt as he sat and listened to his lawyer discuss scheduling a bail hearing. He spoke only briefly to confirm his charges after a court officer misspoke.

The shooting has left a widower, two children and a rattled community.

Police were called to Queen Street East and Carlaw Avenue on July 7 just before 12:30 p.m. for reports of a shooting and said three people had been involved in a verbal and physical altercation before shots were fired.

Huebner-Makurat, a 44-year-old from Toronto who just happened to be walking by, was hit by a bullet. According to police, two men had fired at each other; it’s unclear who fired the bullet that killed Huebner-Makurat.

A memorial on the sidewalk where she fell grew over the weekend. A GoFundMe campaign launched for Huebner-Makurat had raised nearly $250,000 as of Thursday.

A post from friends and family to the fundraising site characterized the mother of two, who they called Caroline, as a “shining light.”

“Caroline loved life and was instant friends with everyone she met. Her great sense of humour always lightened up all situations. She was a kind soul, always eager to lend a helping hand,” the post reads.

They said Huebner-Makurat is survived by her husband and two daughters, aged seven and four.

Police continue to ask the public for help in identifying the two outstanding suspects, who police earlier said are considered armed and dangerous.

Police are asking anyone with information about the shooting or the suspects to contact them at 416-808-7400 or call Crime Stoppers anonymously at 416-222-8477.

With files from Marissa Birnie, Thea Gribilas, Marco Chown Oved and Victoria Gibson

Jennifer Pagliaro is a Toronto-based crime reporter for the Star. Follow her on Twitter: @jpags

 

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